Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Ocean Wise

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Ocean Wise

Ocean Wise became a member of the CCIUCN in 2017.

CCIUCN activity highlights 2017

Education and communication
  • In April we participated in the #NatureForAll dialogue in Vancouver and welcomed the Children and Nature Conference to Vancouver Aquarium for a special evening event.
  • In June we launched https://ocean.org our millennial focussed public engagement portal
  • In July and August, we hosted the Howe Sound and Cambridge Bay scientific Bio Blitz150 events as well as contributed to the Stanley Park public engagement Bio Blitz.
  • In time for the National Conservation Summit in November, we were pleased to supply the #NatureForAll campaign with 1,000 pins to acknowledge and identity members and supporters.
  • Throughout 2017 we were pleased to submit three #NatureForAll stories relating to our Youth leadership Program, Shoreline Clean Up and Curriculum Programs.
  • Throughout 2017 our in person ocean education programs reached over 300,000 participants https://education.ocean.org/
Ecosystem management
  • In February, we released the Ocean Watch Report http://oceanwatch.ca/
  • Based on several years of research focusing on marine ecosystem indicators, we identified seven reporting themes. These themes taken together touch on ecological, socioeconomic, cultural, and governance aspects of ecosystem health and provide a window to the whole picture of what is happening in an area.
Species survival

Endangered

  • Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa)
    Participant in Amphibian Ark and member of the Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Team. Active Oregon Spotted Frog breeding and release program.
  • Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens)
    Participant in Amphibian Ark and member of the B.C. Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team. Active Northern Leopard Frog breeding and release program.

Threatened

  • Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas)
    VA – coordinates the AZA SSP and participates in SSP. CORI – mother and calf acoustic communication studies Arctic & St. Lawrence.
  • Northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus)
    Animals onsite are owned by UBC and are in a conservation focused research program.

Special concern

  • Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas)
    Coordinate and participate in SSP
  • Harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena vomerina)
    Research and Marine Mammal Rescue rehab and release
  • Seat otter (Enhydra lutris)
    No SSP but particpate in studbook
  • Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)
    No SSP but involved in field research project with UBC.
Protected Areas

Ocean Bridge http://bridge.ocean.org/

During 2017 we developed our national marine conservation youth service program in collaboration with our partners Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

 

 

Helping IUCN Members work better together

Shared from the National Committee UK

National Committee UK

The Global Directory of IUCN National and Regional Committees is now available to view and contains information on the activities of these members of the IUCN family as well as their contact details. Global Directory coverYou will see from this document that there are more than 60 officially recognised IUCN National Committees and 7 Regional Committees as well as Country Focal Points in places where these arrangements do not exist. More National Committees are being established regularly, most recently in Benin in West Africa, the United States of America  and Belize in MesoAmerica. The editors intend to regularly update the document which you can also download from the IUCN website.

This Global Directory should also provide some context to help IUCN Members in the West Europe and East Europe and Central Asia region decide on whether to form an InterRegional Committee to join the other Regional Committees in helping IUCN function…

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CCIUCN 2018 Priority Initiative: The Biodiversity Communications Deficit in Canada

Pretty much all of our organizations have communications programs related to biodiversity, so there is no shortage of work being done to improve Canadians’ awareness of the importance of nature. But despite all that effort we aren’t achieving the goals and targets in Canada’s Biodiversity Strategy, and we won’t achieve them until we can communicate the beauty of nature and its many values to society in a way that drives the right policy decisions and enough conservation action to stop the loss.

The importance of this was recognized in the first Aichi Target, which is to ensure “people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to help conserve it.”

In the Biodiversity Strategy for Canada, this need is also reflected in Goal D. Progress has been made, including government’s recent investment of $1.5 billion over five years to reach Target 1 of this strategy by conserving 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water and 10 percent of our coastal and marine areas by 2020. But there are 18 other targets in Canada’s strategy and as we count down to the end of the 2020 phase of the Aichi targets and the upcoming World Conservation Congress in 2020, we need to re-examine our communications and how it is best linked to achieving the other objectives. We will also need to coordinate our work with others across the IUCN to encourage countries to meet their financial commitments to the Convention on Biological Diversity, for members share ideas and to maximize our impact.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Peter Molnar

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Peter Molnar

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough.

I am an active member of the Polar Bear Specialist Group, and the PI of the ‘Quantitative Global Change Ecology Lab’ at the University of Toronto Scarborough. My research on polar bears focuses on physiological and population dynamics models to understand and forecast impacts of climate change. Research on other species ranges from muskoxen and caribou in the Canadian Arctic to jaguars and other large cats in Costa Rica, and focuses on climate change and land use change impacts on these species, in particular through existing and newly emerging parasites and pathogens.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Kim Taylor Thompson

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Kim Taylor Thompson

I am new to the IUCN and I have been working with Harry Jonas on the guidelines for OECMs. This has included review of the guidelines,  providing case studies, and ongoing application of the guidelines as I work classifying natural heritage areas as protected areas , OECMs ( if I should find one), or as not qualifying towards Aichi 11.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.