CCIUCN 2018 Priority Initiative: The Biodiversity Communications Deficit in Canada

Most if not all of our member organizations have communications programs related to biodiversity, so there is no shortage of work being done to improve Canadians’ awareness of the importance of nature. Despite all that effort we aren’t achieving the goals and targets in Canada’s Biodiversity Strategy, and we won’t achieve them until we can communicate the beauty of nature and its many values to society in a way that drives the right policy decisions and enough conservation action to stop the loss.

The importance of this was recognized in the first Aichi Target, which is to ensure “people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to help conserve it.”

In the Biodiversity Strategy for Canada, this need is also reflected in Goal D. Progress has been made, including government’s recent investment of $1.5 billion over five years to reach Target 1 of this strategy by conserving 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water and 10 percent of our coastal and marine areas by 2020. But there are 18 other targets in Canada’s strategy and as we count down to the end of the 2020 phase of the Aichi targets and the upcoming World Conservation Congress in 2020, we need to re-examine our communications and how it is best linked to achieving the other objectives. We will also need to coordinate our work with others across the IUCN to encourage countries to meet their financial commitments to the Convention on Biological Diversity, for members to share ideas and to maximize our impact.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Peter Molnar

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Peter Molnar

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough.

I am an active member of the Polar Bear Specialist Group, and the PI of the ‘Quantitative Global Change Ecology Lab’ at the University of Toronto Scarborough. My research on polar bears focuses on physiological and population dynamics models to understand and forecast impacts of climate change. Research on other species ranges from muskoxen and caribou in the Canadian Arctic to jaguars and other large cats in Costa Rica, and focuses on climate change and land use change impacts on these species, in particular through existing and newly emerging parasites and pathogens.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Kim Taylor Thompson

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Kim Taylor Thompson

I am new to the IUCN and I have been working with Harry Jonas on the guidelines for OECMs. This has included review of the guidelines,  providing case studies, and ongoing application of the guidelines as I work classifying natural heritage areas as protected areas , OECMs ( if I should find one), or as not qualifying towards Aichi 11.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Dan Kraus

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Dan Kraus

Dan-KrausDan Kraus is Nature Conservancy of Canada’s National conservation biologist. He is a member of the Species Survival Commission and Connectivity Conservation Specialist Group. He co-authored Freshwater Key Biodiversity Areas of Canada and the upcoming IUCN report on forest conservation and restoration.

Dan’s blog “Protecting what matters most: Identifying and conserving freshwater key biodiversity areas” describes some of the work that NCC has done with the IUCN.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Lana Ciarniello

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.


Introducing: Lana Ciarniello

a woman standing next to a stream with a bear in the background
Image: Shawn O’Connor

I am Co-Chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Bear Specialist Group’s (BSG) Human-Bear Conflicts Expert Team (HBCET). I have been Co-chair for two terms (last term and this term) and a HBCET member since 2011.

The BSG is part of the IUCN and the SSC. The goal of the BSG is to promote the conservation of bears and their habitats across their distribution world-wide, and to foster cooperative relationships with organizations such as the International Bear Association, other IUCN Specialist Groups, management agencies, educational institutions, captive facilities, citizen’s groups, and non-government conservation organizations (NGCO).

The HBCET exists to provide science-based technical assistance on the prevention or reduction of human-bear conflicts to create a positive effect on human-bear coexistence. Currently, the HBCET has 18 members, representing 4 Continents and 9 Countries (Canada, Croatia, Ecuador, Greece, India, Italy, Turkey, United States and Venezuela). Types of bear conflicts vary enormously around the world, and so do the feasible methods of mitigation, and our members work closely on HBC issues with 7 of the 8 bear species across all 4 continents where bears occur (Polar bears have their own HBC expert team). Our most recent activity was to host an International HBC workshop held in Quito, Ecuador, Nov 2017 (Full with waiting list).

My team’s current initiative is to design a Global Human–Bear Conflicts mitigation manual that captures the variation in HBC in a meaningful way and is useful to people working in the field as well as to governments.

As for me personally, I am an independent Research Scientist that mainly works with bears in BC.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: Ariadne Angulo

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.

Introducing: Ariadne Angulo

A woman standing next to a river
Ariadne visiting a strategic site in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 2014. Image: M. Abadie

I am Co-Chair of the IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group (ASG), a 270+ member, 7700+ species specialist group with a global and class-level remit. The ASG’s mission is to provide the scientific foundation to inform effective amphibian conservation action around the world. The ASG Secretariat works to coordinate ASG’s amphibian research and conservation activities through three main pillars: the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan (ACAP), ASG Regional Groups, and the Amphibian Red List Authority.


Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.

Discovering the IUCN in Canada: James Thorsell

There are over 500 people in Canada who are actively involved with the work of the IUCN and/or the CCIUCN. Many are members in one or more IUCN Commissions. Others belong to IUCN or CCIUCN member organizations. This occasional series will highlight their IUCN-related work in Canada.

Introducing: James Thorsell

thorsell

I worked at IUCN HQ for 23 years as head of the Protected areas program, then as Head of the Natural Heritage program. I semi-retired in 2003 and moved back to Banff where I still act as Senior Advisor to the World Heritage Programme. My main activity these past 15 years has been to advise on World Heritage issues in China and have undertaken 18 field missions there. I am also involved in assisting on study tours to the western mountain parks by various Chinese delegations.


 

Would you like to share your IUCN-related initiatives? Contact us at cciucn@nature.ca.